St. Julien

St. Julien

The St. Julien Memorial is a Canadian war memorial located in Saint Julien, Belgium. The memorial commemorates the Canadian First Division's participation in the Second Battle of Ypres of World War I and their defence against the first poison gas attacks along the Western Front

The German Army had 168 tons of chlorine deployed in 5,730 cylinders opposite Langemark-Poelkapelle, north of Ypres. The Canadians were manning the lines southwest of St. Julien when the German Army unleashed the first poison gas attack on the Western Front on 22 April 1915.



The memorial stands 11 metres tall. The central column rises from a circular flagstone and is sculpted at its top to form the bowed head and shoulders of a Canadian soldier, his hands resting on his reversed rifle.
Tall cedars surround the column, and these have been trimmed into the shape of artillery shells, along with low cut cedars trimmed to look like shell explosions.

At the unveiling, of the memorial, on July 8th 1923, a tribute was made by French Marshal Ferdinand Foch, former supreme commander of the Allied Powers on the Western Front. Foch stated;

'The Canadians paid heavily for their sacrifice and the corner of earth on which this Memorial of gratitude and piety rises has been bathed in their blood. They wrote here the first page in that Book of Glory which is the history of their participation in the war.'
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St. Julien

St. Julien
The St. Julien Memorial is a Canadian war memorial located in Saint Julien, Belgium. The memorial commemorates the Canadian First Division's participation in the Second Battle of Ypres of World War I and their defence against the first poison gas attacks along the Western Front

The German Army had 168 tons of chlorine deployed in 5,730 cylinders opposite Langemark-Poelkapelle, north of Ypres. The Canadians were manning the lines southwest of St. Julien when the German Army unleashed the first poison gas attack on the Western Front on 22 April 1915.



The memorial stands 11 metres tall. The central column rises from a circular flagstone and is sculpted at its top to form the bowed head and shoulders of a Canadian soldier, his hands resting on his reversed rifle.
Tall cedars surround the column, and these have been trimmed into the shape of artillery shells, along with low cut cedars trimmed to look like shell explosions.

At the unveiling, of the memorial, on July 8th 1923, a tribute was made by French Marshal Ferdinand Foch, former supreme commander of the Allied Powers on the Western Front. Foch stated;

'The Canadians paid heavily for their sacrifice and the corner of earth on which this Memorial of gratitude and piety rises has been bathed in their blood. They wrote here the first page in that Book of Glory which is the history of their participation in the war.'
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: